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  • Microstepping

    Oct
    28

    In our last post, we learned about step motor holding torque and pullout torque when full stepping. There was a time when full stepping was the only affordable way to drive a step motor, but advances in processing and sensing have made it possible to divide the typical hybrid step motors 1.8 degree full steps into much smaller steps. Why would we want to do that? Smaller steps improve smoothness and accuracy. Let's revisit the torque versus displacement curves of a step motor being driven in full step. Holding torque and pullout torque are noted.

  • Robot Actuator

    Oct
    28

    We're working with a linear actuator partner to develop a modular, single axis smart robot.  This newly released SWM24 Modbus compatible, IP65 rated drive+motor is a perfect fit for such an application.   Especially when combined with a touch panel HMI.  Who knew step motor motion control could be so easy, yet powerful?

  • Step motor encoder feedback

    Oct
    28
    Please view this video where the tech team at Applied Motion reviews the many ways encoder feedback can improve your motion control.
    DIY
  • IP Rated Step Motors (Ingress Protection)

    Oct
    28

    Generally speaking, electricity and water are a bad mix. Precision electric motors should be keep clean and dry. But that's not practical in some applications, especially if the application is outdoors, like a cell phone tower, or involves processing fluids that can, on occasion escape, like in a brewery. Such applications are best suited for IP rated step motors. Since this is also an engineering blog, we strive for quantitative analysis. As luck would have it, there's a standard for everything, including ingress protection.

  • The OSI Model, Part 2

    Oct
    28

    (The OSI Model, Part 1 may be found here.) Welcome back! Last time we covered the basics of the OSI model and briefly discussed two of the most common forms of serial communications: RS-232 and RS-485.  This time we'll take a quick look at TCP/IP and conclude with a look at how something like standard snail mail might look if we press-fit it into an OSI model mold.

  • The OSI Model (Part 1): 7-layer dip for communications

    Oct
    28
    The OSI model forms the basis of modern communications systems. It uses the concept of layers to explain and formalize the discrete steps in the process of sending data from source to destination.
  • Modbus: 35 Years Old And Still Going Strong

    Oct
    28
    Modbus is a simple communication protocol originally designed in 1979 and intended for use in Industrial Automation systems. The original flavor, Modbus/RTU, was built to utilize serial communications (RS-232 and RS-485 primarily), but it has since been extended to use Ethernet. The Ethernet variant is known as Modbus/TCP. While the core principles remain the same with TCP, the use of TCP/IP communications adds a bit of complexity so we will concentrate on RTU for the remainder of this post.
  • The MCMA Technical Conference, November 3-5

    Oct
    22

    If you're planning to attend the MCMA Technical Conference in Tampa, FL, November 3-5, be sure to attend Don Macleod's break out session on StepSERVO™ closed loop stepper technology, titled Step Servo Technology - Bridging the Gap between Cost Effective and High Performance Motion. In this session Don will explain in detail how StepSERVO closed loop step motor systems offer superior performance over traditional step motor systems, including increased torque and acceleration, better efficiency and quieter operation.

    Events
  • Introducing our Newest, Most Compact StepSERVO™ Motors

    Oct
    22
    The successful line of StepSERVO™ closed loop integrated motors continues to expand with the addition of three NEMA 11 frame models. The TSM11 StepSERVO integrated motors offer the same features and performance benefits of the NEMA 17 and 23 frame StepSERVO motors, but in a much smaller package.
  • Did You Know? New Sensorless Homing Commands

    Oct
    20

    Applied Motion Products stepper and servo drives have supported sensorless homing for several years. Also known as “hard-stop homing”, there is no need for a hard-wired home sensor (hence the name sensorless) when using this method because a physical hard stop is being used to stall the motor, create a position following error, then automatically recover from the fault by moving off the hard stop and setting the home position.

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