You are here

News Feed

  • Dynamic Torque & Step Motor Sizing

    Oct
    28

    In the posts What Do NEMA Sizes Mean? and What is Step Motor Stack Length? we discussed factors affecting holding torque in step motors, such as frame size and stack length.  Holding torque is a measure of how much rotating force is required to force a stationary step motor shaft out of position.

  • How Do You Mount A Step Motor?

    Oct
    28

    If you are new to step motors, you may be wondering how to mount one in your application. You’ll need to be concerned with three things: piloting the motor, fastening it to the mounting surface, and coupling the shaft to your load.

  • Modeling a Step Motor Generator

    Oct
    28

    In our last post, we explored the possibility of connecting a step motor to a small gas engine for use in recharging a 12 volt battery. The effort resulted in a computer model which we hoped to use to optimize the design without having to expend excessive time and effort on trial and error. Our first concern was whether the step motor had the optimal number of winding turns on the stator. Changing the winding of a step motor is a difficult experiment because of the complexity of reprogramming a winding machine and loading it with a different size wire.

  • Measuring Power Dissipation in Step Motors and Drives

    Oct
    28

    Background In some applications, power dissipation in step motors and drives  is a critical aspect of system design. Too much heat from the drive can cause a cabinet to overheat. Too much power loss in the motor can cause the motor to overheat at high ambient temperatures. Heat can also transfer into attached equipment causing it to misbehave. One example is a digital ink pump, where excess heat from the motor can cause undesirable changes in the viscosity of the ink. A recent customer was modeling their enclosure and requested detailed power dissipation data.

  • What Is A Unipolar Step Motor Drive?

    Oct
    28
    What is a unipolar step motor driver? How does a unipolar driver compare to a bipolar step motor driver? When step motors first became popular as a simple, inexpensive means to control position and speed, the transistors required to drive them were very expensive. What, transistors expensive? Don’t they put, like, a billion of them on a chip?
  • Stepper Motor Accuracy

    Oct
    28

    Step motors are prized for their ability to provide precise positioning without a feedback mechanism or closed loop control system.  This inherent precision is owed to the fact that hybrid step motors have toothed rotors and stator that create an electromechanical gearing system to increase the resolution provided by rotating the stator field by 50X.  Move the field by 90° (one full step) and the motor shaft moves by just 1.8°.

  • Microstepping

    Oct
    28

    In our last post, we learned about step motor holding torque and pullout torque when full stepping. There was a time when full stepping was the only affordable way to drive a step motor, but advances in processing and sensing have made it possible to divide the typical hybrid step motors 1.8 degree full steps into much smaller steps. Why would we want to do that? Smaller steps improve smoothness and accuracy. Let's revisit the torque versus displacement curves of a step motor being driven in full step. Holding torque and pullout torque are noted.

  • Robot Actuator

    Oct
    28

    We're working with a linear actuator partner to develop a modular, single axis smart robot.  This newly released SWM24 Modbus compatible, IP65 rated drive+motor is a perfect fit for such an application.   Especially when combined with a touch panel HMI.  Who knew step motor motion control could be so easy, yet powerful?

  • Step motor encoder feedback

    Oct
    28
    Please view this video where the tech team at Applied Motion reviews the many ways encoder feedback can improve your motion control.
    DIY
  • IP Rated Step Motors (Ingress Protection)

    Oct
    28

    Generally speaking, electricity and water are a bad mix. Precision electric motors should be keep clean and dry. But that's not practical in some applications, especially if the application is outdoors, like a cell phone tower, or involves processing fluids that can, on occasion escape, like in a brewery. Such applications are best suited for IP rated step motors. Since this is also an engineering blog, we strive for quantitative analysis. As luck would have it, there's a standard for everything, including ingress protection.

Pages